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Wrapped S Wires


Steve Suits
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Thanks for looking. I'm curious "about"¬†when they stopped wrapping s wires completely and started soldering or welding. The pic is for example. ūüôŹ

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If I am not mistaken, still being used in 30s with foreign fans. I am not a foreign fan buff.

Edited by Russ Huber
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From what I’ve seen, brass cages are all wrapped and almost all steel cages are spot welded.

I assume that the move from brass to steel was to save cost, possibly triggered by WW I need for brass to support the war effort.

I don’t know when spot (resistance) welding began, or if it is not suitable for brass, but this, together with manufacturers’ drive to lower cost, led to abandoning brass and wrapped cages.

It’s kinda sad, because I can see that folks are irritated with today’s throw-away products. There is definitely a market for a quality product. Manufacturers are driven to save pennies, even if it results in a crappy product, because they know that consumers have been trained to accept this situation and to just buy another one every time the old one fails. In the manufacturers’ eyes, selling a $1 fan every year to the same customer for $15 is a win-win situation.  Capitalism is great, but when manufacturers value their profit over the good of society, we have a problem.

 

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1 hour ago, Dave Hoatson said:

From what I’ve seen, brass cages are all wrapped and almost all steel cages are spot welded.

 

The first early 20th century Peerless/Colonial guard is steel.  As are the other manufacture's guards seen here. 

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GE, for one maker, went to welded guards on their 12 and 16" fans after Form V ending in 1920 I think.  My stationary Form W still has a wrapped steel guard although the oscillators may have had welded.   The Sprague in your post above was mine, Form V and 1919, a rebadged GE.

Edited by Steve Stephens
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   This Sprague I'd judge to be 1918, certainly not pre-1917...

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1916 Northwind

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1916 Diehl appears to have the forward ring welded...

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Edited by Steve Rockwell
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Sprague GE models painted green were introduced 19. They remained on the market one more year for the season of 20.

12" and 16" Emerson models went through a major transitional year of fan motor components in 17. But the 8" Northwind with steel guard was on the market 16. As was Fidelity and Lindstrom-Smith. 

Diehl with steel guard in 1916 is Johnny on the spot. 

Menominee 8" clamshell with wrapped steel guard introduced in 1916.

More?

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     Back to wrapping wires...   I don't know whether I discovered this article or whether I followed someone's Old Forum posting which deserves accreditation, my images plucked 7 Mar 2018.....

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1 hour ago, Steve Rockwell said:

     Back to wrapping wires...   I don't know whether I discovered this article or whether I followed someone's Old Forum posting which deserves accreditation, my images plucked 7 Mar 2018.....

Old website post. April, 2013.

GE Making Guards - Pre-1950 (Antique) - Antique Fan Collectors Association - AFCA Forums

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1 hour ago, Robert Todd said:

I assumed this to be a spot welded steel cage on what I have been led to believe is a 1910 R & M telephone booth fan.

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The R&M emblems dates 20s on this spot welded guard.

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