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Removing windings from GE fan


James Byerly
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Purchased old GE fan from antique store , the headwires going into motor are broken, what’s the best way to remove stator windings, in order to solder new wires, ?  Thanks!

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PVC pipe method. Should come out pretty easy. Make sure to feed in the old headwire as the stator progresses outward. 

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I removed the rear cover from motor exposing the stator windings ,but it appears the rest of the motor housing is one piece .Is there another way to remove windings ? Thanks

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Disconnect the headwire from the switch and remove the motor from the yoke.   Make sure the rear motor screws are removed.   Find a 4 ft (give or take)  round piece of PVC or other that will fit inside the hole inside the stator.   Put the motor on top of one end of the pipe and gently tap the other end on the cement and it will slide out a little with each tap.   DON"T BANG IT as that could break the cast iron motor housing.   Firm but gentle taps is all you need.

keep one hand on top of the motor and the other hand holding the pipe just under the motor.  This hand will prevent the stator from going to the ground as it slides out.

Edited by Anthony Lindsey
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one more thing.   Make sure the headwire doesn't hang on the motor hole as the stator slides out.   If it hangs as the stator slides down it could pull the headwire out of the windings.   check the headwire is loose after each tap.

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Anthony did a great job explaining the pvc pipe method that will work for these GE  cast iron housings. The only thing I would add is that the pvc pipe should be of a diameter that fits as close to the inside diameter of the stator as you can reasonably get. You want to get the most contact area between pipe and housing as much as you can. Too small and it increases the risk. 

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BMY stator should slide out without effort. Just do it. 

Edited by Lane Shirey
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39 minutes ago, Lane Shirey said:

BMY stator should slide out without effort. Just do it. 

The last two BMY’s I did required a bit of effort each.  It’s going to vary. 

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Thanks for all the info guys .The front or fan end of the motor housing isn’t removable, it looks like I will have to figure out a way to pull the stator windings out from the back , Or drive it out with a punch from the front holes. I wonder if spraying a little wd-40 on the outside ring on stator would help it to come out ?

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I’m not sure we’re on the same page.  Do you understand the PVC pipe method?  You use a short length of pipe that fits inside the stator, and rest the one end of the pipe against the inside of the housing.  Then tip up the whole thing so the other end of the pipe is pointing down at a solid surface like a concrete floor or the kitchen counter.  Holding the housing, you bring the whole thing down onto the surface so the pipe stops the housing.  With judicious taps this way, the stator will be nudged out of the housing through the repeated shocks.   Make sense?  Or am I just not understanding your dilemma?

Edited by Todd Adornato
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8 minutes ago, Todd Adornato said:

I’m not sure we’re on the same page.  Do you understand the PVC pipe method?  You use a short length of pipe that fits inside the stator, and rest the one end of the pipe against the inside of the housing.  Then tip up the whole thing so the other end of the pipe is pointing down at a solid surface like a concrete floor or the kitchen counter.  Holding the housing, you bring the whole thing down onto the surface so the pipe stops the housing.  With judicious taps this way, the stator will be nudged out of the housing through the repeated shocks.   Make sense?  Or am I just not understanding your dilemma?

The old website so far just keeps coughing up oldies but goodies. I hope it can be preserved. 

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Edited by Russ Huber
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32 minutes ago, Todd Adornato said:

I’m not sure we’re on the same page.  Do you understand the PVC pipe method?  You use a short length of pipe that fits inside the stator, and rest the one end of the pipe against the inside of the housing.  Then tip up the whole thing so the other end of the pipe is pointing down at a solid surface like a concrete floor or the kitchen counter.  Holding the housing, you bring the whole thing down onto the surface so the pipe stops the housing.  With judicious taps this way, the stator will be nudged out of the housing through the repeated shocks.   Make sense?  Or am I just not understanding your dilemma?

 

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Sorry , I didn’t understand the concept . I get it now , I thought you were talking about driving the stator out the other end using the pvc. I’m a little slow at times . Thanks a lot ! 

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Hey guys , Thanks for all the help ! I really appreciate it ! Sorry you’ll had to draw me a picture,

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Keep one hand on the PVC while tapping out the stator. When the stator comes free, it'll plop down onto your softer hand versus hitting the harder table or floor. 

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1 minute ago, Patrick Ray said:

Keep one hand on the PVC while tapping out the stator. When the stator comes free, it'll plop down onto your softer hand versus hitting the harder table or floor. 

And keep emphasis on the word "tapping". DO NOT use "LETHAL" force "TAPPING" the PVC tube on the concrete. The stator will gradually slide out. Too much force runs the risk of cast housing fracture around the vent holes. 

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Thanks so much guys ! 2 taps on the basement floor and the stator fell out. Knowledge is a powerful tool. A million Thanks !!!!!!!!!!

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3 hours ago, James Byerly said:

Thanks so much guys ! 2 taps on the basement floor and the stator fell out. Knowledge is a powerful tool. A million Thanks !!!!!!!!!!

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Congratulations James! I originally posted a Stars & Stripes fireworks YouTube video for you, but the post magically disappeared.  🙂

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4 hours ago, James Byerly said:

Thanks so much guys ! 2 taps on the basement floor and the stator fell out. Knowledge is a powerful tool. A million Thanks !!!!!!!!!!

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Glad you got it out! The next BMY will be easy. 

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Just be aware- never use the pipe method on a stamped steel mount housing or you will likely distort the bearing alignment. This method is only for cast iron housings. And even some of those will break, depending on the make and model.  

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Thank you guys for all the help . I got it back together and it runs great I changed the front and back oil wicks I made them the same length as the old ones . Is there a rule of thumb on how much of the wick should be touching the fan shaft ?

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