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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/04/2024 in all areas

  1. Just finished this lil guy! Factory finish was shot so I sent it off for powder coat. Thanks to Korey Kreitman for the new motor housing nuts. Tony Clayton custom wire for the head wire and power cord. And thanks to Mark Olson for the rewind on the field coils.
    16 points
  2. Got this little guy done. It's a 8" Made-Rite one speed with SB/SC. The base is cast iron, the motor housing is stamped steel. I powder coated it a tractor green. Powder coated the cage and blade chrome. The coupler ring I spray painted it a black wrinkle finish. I added an inline power switch for convivence. I want to thank Louis Luu for making the badge file. I think it came out pretty good.
    11 points
  3. I had a little time on my hands and decided to put some parts together. My neighbor wanted to see the process of how I come up with these things, so I made consecutive videos of the work in progress and put them together from start to finish. I left out the drudgery of cutting, bending, soldering, drilling and tapping chores. I've moved on to restoring a 16 inch Verity's Orbital next. Cheers, Bill
    8 points
  4. Thanks to Louis and his generosity, I now have a big Verity's. I have a couple of the little guys, but this is my first large orbit fan. I ended up restoring it because it appeared to me to have been restored at some point. It was in pretty good condition aside from the paint and covered in a thick layer of deposits of some kind. Under the crust, the chrome looks nearly new, so nothing has bee rechromed, included the screws. The rubber feet and grommets were nice enough to re-use after soaking in AFT overnight to soften them. A note of caution for anyone going to restore one of these. The paint is near indestructible and withstood soaking in paint remover and my torch. Only soaking in lacquer thinner got it soft enough to remove with a wire wheel. That was a whole day stripping paint. I manage to nail the color with powder coat from Prismatic Powders, also. The speed label I made on my computer. It runs rather slow, I think, even though there is no drag on the parts, it ohms out OK and draws about 10% over the rated wattage. I think it's down to 50 vs 60 cycles. No worries, though, as 16 inch fans typically run too fast to use in my place. So after it warmed up to a crisp 63 degrees this morning, I made a short video of it. Cheers, Bill
    7 points
  5. Good evening fan friends. The Kanthal arrived today. It took a bit of work to wind the Kanthal around the tower after having painted the Sodium Silicate over the asbestos on the tower. The Kanthal kept slipping down the tower. The fix was to take my tiny tweezers to create small notches in the sodium silicate to hold the Kanthal in place while I was winding it. Below is what the coil looked like with 6.5 feet of nichrome wire which provided 26 ohms of resistance (not enough to give a noticably slower second speed). I replaced the nichrome with about half as much Kanthal or 3.5 feet, which was rated at 14.3 ohms/foot. This provided 50 ohms of resistance which gave me a nice second speed. Below is a picture of the rewound choke coil with the Kanthal wire (thanks to Tom Newcity for suggesting this). Give a listen to the video below and you'll hear the nice second speed with the new Kanthal wire. This was much easier to do than I had imagined so I would encourage anyone to give it a try.
    6 points
  6. The shaft is pressed in. Tremendous amount of force to remove and likely could damage the casting. Additionally everything that is machined is relative to that shaft location and changing that would likely throw off that as well. Most folks simply remove the insulation paper and clean around the shaft and the outside of the oil ports with solvent. Using gun bore type cleaning tools and solvent you can adequately clean the ID of the shaft. Highly recommend not trying to press out that shaft! ...........Dan H.
    6 points
  7. Hi Everybody! I have been thinking about making one of the for a while, It was a lot harder than I thought. I guess the balancing of motor gave me the most problem. Well here it is. I have not named it yet !
    6 points
  8. They used to be cheaper and came in packs of 50 back in 2015 when I ordered them. They fit perfect, just twice as thick. I simply carefully cut them in half with a one sided razor. Then you have two. 🙂 McMaster-Carr
    5 points
  9. Someone had to explain to me what a TP roll is...
    5 points
  10. I will post with prices in the BST as soon as I get the pricing... I just purchased about 50lbs. Of solid brass slotted machine screws for those projects that need a little bling... Most of these machine screws are about 75yrs old and come from an old factory in NY... These are ase sized and usable for nearly all American fans... I have these in quantity! You need them, chances are I have them... I am taking these to any fan meets I go to and will ship! Here are some pics. to wet your whistle! It is a drag to need proper slot headed screws that are not skinned up for your project! These will make any fan collectors projects shine! Message me if you need them mailed! My plans are to sell these for half or less what you will find them for anywhere...
    4 points
  11. That's a question I can answer for you 👍👍👍
    4 points
  12. Finally getting the imperial back together. Newly chromed cage and all. Here’s the long back story if anyone cares to read it…. In a roundabout way this was a Christmas gift from my 12 year son and his aunt. There’s a way more heartwarming aspect to that story but I’ll leave that out. Fan seemed to have been redone by someone somewhat competent…they did a pretty decent job on the repaint. And they used twisted cloth wire (although it was the stiff stuff not the good stuff). From the looks of the paint and the cloth wire, I never would’ve thought it wouldn’t fire right up. Well…almost “fire right up” it did on Christmas morning with a big spark and a pop much to the dismay of me and especially my son. So after reassuring him that I’d get it running again a few days later I dug into it. Well, needless to say, the wiring was a total hack job. NOTHING was soldered. Just haphazardly twisted wires with crummy vinyl electrical tape. Even at the stator!!!!! ((If whomever did this fan is in this group you should be ashamed! Maybe you’ll recognize your work from the pix))). I couldn’t believe it. Then…upon taking it apart (not my first headwire but my first swan tear down) to put a proper headwire on I bascially ruined the stator. (I’ll mention what I did hear just in case it helps another newbie….the rotor would not clear the windings and I wasn’t comfortable trying to push them out of the way. So I had the bright idea of trying to drop the rotor and the stator together and then pull the rotor out the back. Seemed like a decent idea at the time….well for some reason, (and yea I removed the worm gear, it was very difficult to get off. More on that later) the rotor was hanging up in the rear bearing! I didn’t realize this as I was cusping the housing and the rotor and gently tapping my hands on the workbench to drop them. So….you guessed it….the stator kept coming out and as the rotor wasn’t, it scraped on the rotor damaging some windings. Totally deflated, the next day I endeavored to try a fix. It metered good so I thought there was hope.I sprayed the bejeezus out of the windings especially the damaged area with the proper varnish. Then did some surgery on the remnants of wire exiting the stator. I have to admit…this was a pretty darned nice bandaid repair. In fact, I still have to wonder if this fix would’ve worked. But what I did next further ruined it….Mostly, I’ve worked on single bearing Emerson’s in which case I’ve ran the motor with the front housing off. You know so you can kind of see the rotor move into the center of the field etc. Anyhow….I did that with this not realizing the front bearing support was needed. Heck I don’t even know if I remembered to put the stator threaded rods in to firmly mount it in the housing. Anyhow….I can’t remember if there was a pop, or if it just started smoking. I’m guessing the rotor was just sort of laying on the stater and that’s what fried the motor. But it was dead after that). So…after fully tearing it down I decided to get the cage rechromed. There was a pretty thick layer of yellowed varnish on it. Plus in some areas it looked like somebody actually sanded it down to bare metal and then varnished. I don’t think it was original lacquer or clear…maybe it was…but the chrome underneath just don’t look good after I removed a bit and polished the chrome. So…I dropped it off at St. Louis Plating in stl and the guy got it done in 4-5 days for $100 cash!!!!!! Totally awesome job. And then I sent the stator off to Mark Olson who did a great job with faster than expected turn around. So….here we are. I brought it with me along with an entire compliment of tools and such to my hotel in Sandusky (where I’m working for a few months). This was my first swan tear down and it wasn’t too bad. I did discover that the end of the rotor shaft was mushroomed a bit. Not sure how that happened but it would explain why the worm gear was sooooo hard to remove and of course why it hung up in the bearing (oh…I managed to salvage the bearing I suppose…rolled up little pieces of 320,400,600…1000 grit sandpaper and smoothed out the damage. It seems to be ok as there doesn’t seem to be any up and down or lateral slop but time will tell? I wonder if that mushrooming was from the factory pressing on that worm gear????? Or if the guy who did this fan for some reason was beating on it???? I guess in the future I will take a small file to the end of the shaft before even attempting to remove the work gear? Regardless, I ended up taking a file and sandpaper to the end and getting rid of the mushrooming and got the worm gear on and everything back together. Also noticed that the cage to base mounting….it’s a little katywompus…skewed about to one side. It looks worse in the attached photo. There’s no adjustment built into this so not sure why it’s that way…maybe just a Monday morning? I’ve yet to attach the headwire and switch etc. Haven’t yet soldered in my hotel room….I’m thinking I may go in the bathroom and turn the exhaust fan on and close the door….that usually works for soldering and not setting off the fire alarm. Don’t want to be “that guy” lol. Not sure what cord I’m going to use. Contrary to what a lot of people think these did not have twisted cloth wire on them. My chrome faced 10” swan from 1938 has the original cord and it is a little bit more similar to rubberized lamp cord. Although the groove down the middle is not as prominent. I have yet to find anything like this. if you look in the Emerson catalogs as well, you can see this style rubber cord. I may use some of the two conductor overbraid as sort of a visual compromise. I don’t want something that looks too modern or modern at all. I did find a nice soft rubber appliance cord at Ace Hardware that is much softer than typical lamp cord, but I just don’t know if I want the look of lamp cord on this fan. So….there it is. My imperial rising from the ashes story lol. IMG_4790.mp4
    4 points
  13. I have a spare can also. Personally I like Anthony’s approach. I found a few cans after searching hardware stores nation wide. I used most on a GE AK1 (1930) and found it to be very dark and didn’t really match the original. I recently acquired a 1926 GE with its original paint and I can tell you that Anthony’s mix is almost spot on to the original paint. I have a paint store near me that deals with local auto painters and will match and mix up any color you want. They’ll give it to you in pop cans too. I’m gonna take Anthony’s pic and have them mix up a small batch to use on my most recent GE project. Photo #1 is the GE 16” AK1 Photo #2 is a 12” 78x840 with original paint.
    3 points
  14. I picked this out of a color book. Not sure it's exact but it looks great
    3 points
  15. There's only two reasons I can think to spring for one. 32VDC and the wheel....
    3 points
  16. Don't ask where the shaded pole is
    3 points
  17. I 2nd that emotion. Good way to knock out the back of the motor casting as well
    3 points
  18. I found this vornado 16pb1 pedestal on my local offer up, it only runs on one speed right now and I can not get the pedestal to raise , other then that and some rust on the base , it is in decent condition
    3 points
  19. My 16" also runs slow or at least slower than other fans. 20220827_192455.mp4
    3 points
  20. Beautifull work Bill and a great job on the video!👍👍 I have the same fan as you do but there are slight differences . Mine is in brass as yours is in nickel. Mine is 60 cycles, 220vac, yours is 50 cycles , 230/250vac. Mine is stamped V1, yours V12. Mine is supposed to run at 1300rpm, yours 1200rpm. Both were made at the same plant. Louis also helped me out with parts and you had made a brass strut for it.
    3 points
  21. All Photos Courtesy of miSci The Museum of Innovation and Science Schenectady NY Credited to Steve Rockwell for sharing a view into the past you had damn well better appreciate.
    3 points
  22. Great job.. I can only imagine the trials and tribulations.. I can see I’m gonna have to up my game..
    3 points
  23. Picked this stuff today... The vane runs well, now I have 2 good running vanes sans the cage and vane parts! Century S-3 round back, and a very nice kidney not cracked up! And a brass bell GE... oh yeah! Smoked oysters and crackers for supper! Very satisfying!
    3 points
  24. Make sure the leading edge is razor sharp. That way, it doesn't hurt so much when it removes your finger. yikes.
    3 points
  25. FWIW.....A way to reason LH threads is the direction the oscillation shaft is turning from the worm gear end. The blade turns clockwise and thus so does the shaft from the worm gear end. Any friction between the shaft/worm gear and the hex bushing will only tighten the bushing with left hand threading. So left hand threading it is. It is always handy when opportunity arises at low cost to get a rust bucket Emerson oscillator stump or two in the 24xxx-29xxx types. They have parts to rob Peter to pay Paul. 🙂
    3 points
  26. Recently found an Emerson trivit. Perfect fit for an 8" saucepan... Yes, I did ask... said that's the only part she had.
    3 points
  27. Great finds, Rocky!,... 'cept for the oysters.
    3 points
  28. That is called copper flashing under the Black Oxide finish.
    3 points
  29. Copper and Black paint, as two other original finishes.
    3 points
  30. So I went to remove the base to put on a temporary power cord. Thinking I was removing what I thought was like a 16th” thick piece of Masonite, is actually steel, and sandwiched in between that and the base I s this thinner piece of what feels like Masonite but like 1/32nd of an inch thick, maybe it’s some kind of card stock or oil board. And it has the instructions printed on it. How cool is that?
    3 points
  31. Here is a mottled copper model of this fan. I always thought it beautiful. This one is also marked DC.
    3 points
  32. These are some of Jim's close friends, so it is in your best interests you follow through, for your sake and mine. 🙂
    2 points
  33. Your example is a 1910-11 BMY. 08-09 has no trunnion pivot feature. 08-09 struts mount to the front motor housing. Your example also appears to have no centrifugal switch start winding which could be found on the early 1910 variant.
    2 points
  34. Oscillator arm was rusty and pitted. Wanted to do something different and not paint it like the rest of the fan. Did a homebrew nickel plating! Can still see some of the pits from the rust, but I'll call it a win!
    2 points
  35. I have two of these 12" Diehl oscillators that model, they run strong and the gear box seems to be better than the earlier ones .
    2 points
  36. Thanks all for the very generous comments. I tested the battery charge duration and it came to about 3 hours. That's a bit short so, first, I made a trap door for quick battery changes and, second, I ordered an extension cable for the charging plug. That way I can just leave it on the charger and I won't have to change batteries unless I'm in a mobile situation. The 3s battery still isn't here, so I haven't been able to test that one out yet. Cheers, Bill
    2 points
  37. You guys crack me up 😂
    2 points
  38. Blank badges just arrived. Looks good.
    2 points
  39. no high values, I like them AKA "Hassock" fans I have 4, an R&M, 2 Emersons (1962-1952) and a DIehl Wood model
    2 points
  40. The four connected cylinders are not galvanic cells (batteries), but are Leyden jars (capacitors) connected in parallel. Leyden jars are electrostatic reservoirs. That ball is most likely made of pith and is suspended by a very flexible conductive thread. Works on the same principle as a pith ball electroscope. Like charges repel thus causing deflection. Indicates relative strength of electrostatic charge.
    2 points
  41. In case you're nostalgic Paul. Bonus pic is the ward swan (I've only had it out and about once). Sorry for the crappy pics and I need to dust them. We recently had some work done in house and it's just getting back to the point I could unearth these. I'll post better pics to my galleries in the future and after they're cleanup up some. Note how long that little oscillator mech was in production btw. It's a simple effective unit....
    2 points
  42. If I had one,... I'd put a cake on it!
    2 points
  43. Hello all! 3 months after, here is the WT22 with the cage/grill. A wonderful, precision work that only costed me 70€. It was made without any protection on the brasileiro that will now age till match the blades colour. Hopefully... made in Portugal.
    2 points
  44. I’ve had those moments where my parents agree for once that my fans are useful lol.
    2 points
  45. Yeah I was thinking the same thing. I know when I stripped my gun blued GE all brass last summer (kind of regret it but the blueing was not cleaning up good, or how I thought it should be at the time, and I ended up going through to the brass in a couple areas so I said what the heck. Did thai all by hand with blue magic and microfiber btw ), I got a kind of rosey copper color directly under the blueing. I’m certain this wasn’t a layer of copper plating, but seems like a natural occurance in the brass perhaps as a chemical reaction to the blueing process. So yeah…I think spoken maybe stripped the blueing or oxide finish off?
    2 points
  46. FWIW....you can have fun with those little guys. Most go to a buffing wheel with an all brass despite the style number finish. 🙂 The stained/varnished base. Base came from Hobby Lobby, the composite discs under the base I had cut to size at a trophy shop, the feet came from McMaster. Enjoy your toy. 🙂
    2 points
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