Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/03/2023 in all areas

  1. Needs a few things... The original pin striping is there! Needs a few pieces but I think Paul Graves has them in a drawer somewhere in his shop!😊😊
    15 points
  2. This is a splicing method I use for tight spaces like inside the motor housing or anywhere a big, fat wire splice will just not work. 1. Strip and clean about 1/2 inch of both wires 2. Slide a short piece of shrink tube on the new wire 3. Pull a 2 inch single strand of copper wire from a donor wire, tie a loose overhand knot and put it over the new wire. 4. Push the stranded wires together so they somewhat intertwine and temporarily clip them together. I use an alligator clip for this but if you were around in 1969 we called is by another name. 5. Move your knotted loop to the center of the splice and tighten. Tweezers work well here. 6. Tightly wrap the donor wire strand in one direction, then the other end. 7. A drop if solder is optional but will make the splice bullet proof. 8. Move the shrink tube up and heat to insulate and strengthen. 9. To finish the head wires, I use a flat woven shoelace as a fabric conduit. Cut off the plastic end tips and you have a nice woven tube to dress up your head wires. Terry Plata
    12 points
  3. I was fortunate to live in a house with a really big back yard that has been able to host 3 barns / storage buildings, 2 of which were constructed since we bought the place in 1993. My Bride tends to like retiring early, like when the sun goes down. There was a time when I would come home from a fan meet or a weekend search and acquire event and I would arive home just after dark, drive directly to the barns out back, unload a truck load of whatever, then turn around and " come home " with an empty truck. I did get into trouble occasionally, like when we went to one of the early fanfairs in DeSoto TX. We cane down with a carload of fans to use as illustrations in a seminar event. They somehow seemed to attract more fans during the Bourse event & Auction. I had to rent a U-Haul trailer one way to Arkansas to get everyone back home. Couldn't hide those....
    10 points
  4. I took a handful of fans to the meet and was very fortunate to sell more than I expected. Thank you everyone who purchased one. That gave me the green light to nab this Trojan 5320. It’s wired direct and painted blue. Fortunately the switch is there and the motor fired right up. It has a braille tag. I couldn’t find any other examples pictured with that tag. Not very many in the survey. Donna was ready to kill me for bringing another 16” in the house. I explained it was a “good” one. Here’s some pictures.
    9 points
  5. Turned out pretty good. Had issues with rotor making a loud thumping noise, so I replaced it with a 77646 rotor. Runs smooth now. I had some white paint so I painted it white with blue felt to match the badge.
    9 points
  6. I finally got this fan back together and running. There are a few guys I want to thank for making this possible. Louis Luu supplied me with the four wing blade, cage, handle and 3 struts plus his knowledge of the fan. Bill Dunlap made me an exact copy of the fourth brass strut. Donald Coleman made me awesome replicas of the badge and id base tag. Tony Clayton did a great job on the wire. Jim Roadt had a beautiful white porcelain plug for it. A friend of mine made me two oil lite motor bearings. The Verity has BB/BC, brass struts and hardware. It runs on 220vac. I bought a power converter for it. It runs smooth on 3 distinct speeds and oscillates in an orbital motion. I did the powder coating job myself. Before post: I reformed the handle
    8 points
  7. Thanks to all who shared pictures of Typhoons installed. Lots of great old buildings! Got a video of testing out Andrew's 'Phoon yesterday! Hope you find it interesting.
    8 points
  8. Had a visit yesterday from Brad Chaney and wife Jane E of Washington State. They are on a three week roadtrip , checking things out and paid us a visit at the Museum. While they couldn't stay for the meet, we had a nice visit and Brad gave me a 1904 GE type AG form D 12 inch exhaust fan. It is very unusual in that it's original owner fabricated an anti-reversal mechanism on the blade. As soon as I can build a stand for it, the fan will be on display in the Museum. Thank you Brad and Jane. Hope you have a great rest of your trip. Be safe and Thank you.
    7 points
  9. I got it for $585 before premium, fee, tax and shipping. I was aware of the wrong blade but thought it's still an Ok price.
    7 points
  10. 4 fan meets coming up, come meet your fan family & see tables full of fans for sale & show. Fall Fan Fest, next weekend Museum Meet, two weeks away Lake Houston Meet, less than a month away (October 6 & 7) Old Fan Workshop, first weekend of November. See you around the fan tables!
    6 points
  11. Maybe someday this will get a switch. 5210 with thinner housing
    6 points
  12. Video of me laser cutting the vulcanized fiber insulators. Also information on winding choke coil below.
    6 points
  13. Well, Gerry, I wish it was more comical, but at one point there was a lot of kidding going around on the forum about the Board members flying to and from FanFair and other meets on the corporate jet, and well, I admit to altering a photo I found of a private black jet to look like it had the new AFCA logo on it. Unfortunately, I believe the dues we pay to be members barely cover the printing of the magazine and our yearly web and forum hosting (if it covers that), so I highly doubt that there is any room left for any perks let alone a corporate jet. Honestly though, I think Rocky keeps the jet parked at his place in case he hears about an Emerson Jr. for sale somewhere. 😂
    6 points
  14. Mike Mirin announces the start of the Museum Meet on Thursday.
    6 points
  15. And we have a young collector named Ellis! His momma says he has 200 in his collection! So I am helping the young feller out with his addiction!😅🤣😂
    6 points
  16. Jim Henderson's Meston fan on display at the AFCA Museum at Fanimation, located in Zionsville.
    6 points
  17. So, I replaced the original 5" motor pulley with a 9" pulley. It seems a lot happier!
    6 points
  18. Friends: I just acquired a wonderful example of an Edison Bi-Polar from one of our esteemed, long time members. It arrives tomorrow. I was hoping that one of you (Russ Huber?) could give me a date of manufacture based on the serial number seen below. The seller, who shall remain anonymous, acquired the fan in 2008, from a bank president who had the fan in the basement of the bank (I will keep the picture of the bank with the fan at all times). I consider myself very fortunate indeed to acquire this marvellous piece of history and am very grateful to the seller who is a long time friend and gentleman.
    6 points
  19. Thanks! I wish I had some wild story but it is pretty mundane. Bought a fan off the internet, the seller messaged about having some other fans but didn't want to deal with shipping etc. Came to an agreement and went and picked up. There were some pretty good fans in the batch including that one. 9 hours of driving that day. or...... It was a dark stormy night and I was trespassing looking thru old buildings. Came across one deep in the woods and once I got thru the briars and brambles managed to get inside. Found a secret trap door into a Speakeasy/brothel and after I picked the 3 locks managed to get it open. Squeezed past the skeletons at the card table with the half empty bottle of bathtub gin.......... tripped over the cone base meston.......
    6 points
  20. Here’s my technique, and it involves no deception at all … well maybe just a bit of a ploy. My wife loves purses. Every time she sees one she likes, I encourage her (almost to the point of insisting) to get it. She now has a closet of purses. I have a basement of fans. We’re a happy pair. 😆
    6 points
  21. I was able to sneak it from the porch to the fan room today.I have so many she will not notice.I can hear it now!Really! Another one! It’s not like I have problem.I have only purchased 5 ,or was it 6 fans ? since last month. She is sound asleep so here we go.Quiet Now! Let’s see if it survived its travel. Paul, this struck me very amusing. How many of us sneak fans into our basements where they can blend in unnoticed.
    6 points
  22. I now have a set.Wings wings and more wings. I may make a short video tomorrow.
    6 points
  23. Got it finished up today. Thanks to everyone that provided wiring help and big thanks to Mark Olson for doing the new japan finish. This will probably be a daily runner for me. 20230912_152302.mp4
    6 points
  24. I can’t resist showing one of my favorite fans. My little grandson actually got his hand smacked for touching this one! Wesco 5610. Even though his middle name is Emerson, a guy has to draw the line somewhere.
    5 points
  25. Pay, no,... perquisites, yes. Right?, Stan.
    5 points
  26. 5 points
  27. I spoke to Jim with Data1 Systems yesterday. He has a backup of our old forum. He said that he needs to setup some servers anyway and will see what he can do to set us up with access to the old forum. Stay tuned.
    5 points
  28. I was the fortunate winner of the raffle fan at this years Fan Fair in Franklin, TN. It is treasured in our home. Thank you to all who made it possible, especially, Darrel Koller for the beautiful work on the fan, Chad Baker for donating the 6 wing BMY and Rick Huckabee for rewinding the 6 pole motor. Finally, I also want to thank George and Karla Durbin who put in countless hours selling raffle tickets. All of these people volunteered their efforts along with those purchasing tickets to support the AFCA.
    5 points
  29. This arrived in the mail today and looks incredible. Louis refused to take any payment and said he gives away the prototypes. It looks even better than I expected. Wonderful work from a wonderful club member. 👍👍👍
    5 points
  30. Sherwood is right, November 2-4 provided civilization remains intact. Pencil that in on your calendar Tim & come on over.
    5 points
  31. Other than a small vibration, which I'll double check in a month. I love the way it turned out. Not sure if rear of motor guard had a badge or not. Run down was around 18 seconds. Thanks again to members of this forum.
    4 points
  32. Great work you do Louis . You should be able to make 200 of those and sell all of them.
    4 points
  33. Rob you are not being snubbed, I promise. The AFCA is a 100% volunteer organization run by folks who have full time jobs elsewhere. For that reason, it takes some time for everything to get processed. The good thing is not one penny of your dues goes toward paying any of the officers or directors. The bad thing is that means we are a little slow.
    4 points
  34. This one is probably late 30s, much newer.
    4 points
  35. The pictures didn't show the scale of this thing! It belongs to my friend Andrew B. I helped move it from a business to my shop so we can get it going and he can get it home. The pictures show it being loaded with an overhead crane at an industrial site in northern Alabama. The man who runs the site bought a load of random materials and junk to use for industrial projects at his business. This fan was in the auction lot buy so he doesn't know the history on it, although he is very interested in the history of things like this. For that reason it was not recycled nor parted out. This is a VERY early fan. It has an ornate cast iron ring-oiled General Electric motor and flat-belt pulley. Built with cast iron shroud ring, and lots of bracing and supports. Very intricately manufactured. The picture of the wheel shows just how heavy it is. The caster is literally crushed flat. We're planning to work on it this weekend. Hopefully a run video will follow.
    4 points
  36. LOL I think it might end up more of a spreader or scatterer, if used that way... but there is still room to add another belt driven pump to the setup in there to keep that to a minimum! Thanks and glad you're finding it fascinating! As said; it belongs to Andrew B so he will have to answer that question. Glad you're interested in it. It's a very neat fan for sure! As for the pulley, the VFD tells me the actual delivered kW going to the motor. It's a 2 HP motor so it should receive about 1.5 kW to 2 kW or so, counting for efficiency. With the small pulley it was barely 300W of load on the motor at 60 Hz. Fan power curves are logarithmic versus shaft RPM and very hard to predict. I made a test by running the motor speed up until the fan started to draw more power and sounded "right" so to speak. It seemed that at around 115 to 120 Hz (with the original 5" pulley) it seemed happiest. I didn't want to run long like that because the motor its self isn't designed for that level of speed for many reasons, but it gave an idea of what the fan should sound like. That is running two times the speed it was originally. So, I looked around and found a 9" pulley which is not quite twice the diameter of the original. So the answer is it was an educated guess, based on making a few tests and then finding something I had here, already which was close to what I thought would be best. It's definitely in the logarithmic region of the power curve now. If I go from 60 Hz up to 65 Hz, it makes a marked increase in power demand (hundreds of watts), whereas with the small pulley it didn't make much of a difference until the speed was approaching 90 Hz or more. With the new pulley, running on the VFD, it uses about 6 amps at 170V running smoothest. I ran it for an hour and the warmest part of the motor was the bearings with very little heat in the stator.
    4 points
  37. Bill Fanum, Chad Baker, Jerry Bravi and Liem Nguyen
    4 points
  38. After I completed connecting the head wire leads to the switch I powered and tested the switch/motor operation with the switch out of the base. All went well after the test, and I bolted the switch in and put the switch cover on and set the fan stump upright. I then plugged the power cord back in and tried the switch and.......nothing. Totally dead on all 3 speeds. I then proceeded to lay the fan back down and remove the switch to see what got messed. After I took the switch out, I could see nothing wrong. I once again plugged the power cord back into the socket and operated the switch. All 3 speeds were there once again. I then unplugged it and put the switch back into the base, put the switch cover back on and set it upright and plugged it back in. I pushed the switch lever over to start it and once again nothing on all 3 speeds. All I could think was what to hell is going on? This makes no damn sense. I went through the switch thoroughly prior. I removed, cleaned, buffed, and straightened the switch lever. I had everything Johnny on the spot. What is wrong? I then put my eyes level with the switch lever opening with switch in base. Bingo! I found the problem. Despite the switch lever being straight as an arrow, the switch body required spacers above to bring it down a tad. Why? The switch lever insulator was being pressed down by the upper lever slot casting by roughly 1/16" or less when installed, just enough to create a disconnect between the lever and the switch contacts, despite smooth switch lever motion.
    4 points
  39. That wrong blade looks to be in really good shape and could probably help you recoup part of the cost of one of those magnificant Bravi replacements
    4 points
  40. Picked these up about a month ago... I assume the oil in these are the real deal and not safe?
    3 points
  41. A clean machine, partial paper label left!
    3 points
  42. Hello friends from yet another rainy weekend in the Boston area. Second rainiest year on record! Yesterday, the Edison battery that I purchased arrived. It was exceedingly well wrapped. I removed the pieces that hung inside the porcelain jar and cleaned them up. If you look closely, you can see the Thomas Edison name cut into the center piece, which I presume is lead. The piece is framed with copper, which is attached to two pieces of brass. These protruded from the top of the porcelain jar seen below. The other two pieces were attached to the center holes of the lid and were suspended on either side of the lead sheet. I presume that these pieces were suspended in a liquid containing some type of acid which facilitated the movement of electrons from the two smaller pieces to the center sheet of lead, where they flowed out through the brass terminals. Darryl Hudson advised me that one of these jars could produce 1 to 1.4 volts of DC power so that four, wired consecutively, could produce enough power to run the six armature Edison fan. I can imagine that four of these jars, filled with an acid solution, contained within a box must have been quite heavy. Perhaps one of you fine folks could fill in the missing information on this arrangement? What is the composition of the stuff on the end of the two pieces of copper seen in the photo above? How long would this arrangement produce power before the parts and/or the acid solution needed replacing? Thank you for reading this. I inserted the six-volt battery and the drok buck (step down) converter into the now empty porcelain jar (below). Tony Clayton is making me some very special, curled wire for this arrangement which I expect next week. I should also point out that the above arrangement was certainly not my idea. I copied the arrangement from the Davis family's sale of their beloved (late) father's Edison fan, which you can see on eBay.
    3 points
  43. Non detergent oil such as 3-in-1 in the BLUE can or zoom spout oil. For grease Red and Tacky is good.
    3 points
  44. A big shout out to everyone who attended the 6th Annual Meet @ the Museum. Had collectors from all over come in. A huge thank you to Chris Smith, who is constantly helping out when needed. Some of the states represented were Washington State, Utah, Texas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Arkansas, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Tennessee, Virginia, Colorado, Illinois, Oklahoma, Georgia, Indiana, and Missouri. We served up dogs and chili on Thursday and Pizza on Friday. Coffee and doughnuts were on hand all three days. All thirty tables were filled with goodies for sale, as were several tables and benches inside the shop. People started showing up on Wednesday, continuing thru Thursday and Friday, with Saturday being the slow day, but still having thirty or so collectors hanging out. The last people leaving around 3:30 that afternoon. We had the Summit City Car Club show up on Friday, with around twenty people and twelve classic cars visiting the Museum. Hopefully people took pictures of the meet and will post them here. I always get distracted and forget to take pics. We also had members from the Ceiling Fan Kids show up and worked all week taking down and putting up fans in the upstairs Museum. They took off after 4:30 on Saturday after many exhausting days. Thanks to Donovan, Andrew, and Louis. We won't be having another Museum meet until 2025 due to Fan Fair being held here next year, but we may do an informal meet sometime that Fall of 2024. Thanks again everyone. I had a great time!
    3 points
  45. And other than the brass blade being painted black there is not a bend or ripple anywhere.This one will clean up nicely.Most the pen stripes are still visible.I plugged it in ,all four inches of line cord and not a hint of vibration.The motor is soundless with nothing but wind.These R+Ms(Technically)are impressive.One of my Westinghouse fans may lose its prime spot.
    3 points
  46. Gentlemen I submit to you what I am concluding to be a wonderful looking but unfortunately not original DC Ball Motor Jandus. This fan was part of Jack Johnson’s collection and I have researched the old forums and have found nothing to document a matching as this. What I think I have is wall mount DC Jandus motor stuck on a Jandus base or a wire mount Jandus that some one has placed a DC ball motor. I offer this to the forum for your thoughts on this one. I don’t think a wire mount DC desk fan was offered. Is this real, or a Frankenstein? Any advice is welcomed. My best to everyone, Mel
    3 points
×
×
  • Create New...