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Emerson Pancake fan help


Tim Babcock
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Never worked on one of these before. Its all standard but how to remove the stater. I took the screws out holding the back plate but I am not sure how to get the stater out. I am doing this one for a friend. I tried to buy this fan a couple of times but he will not part with it. But asked if I could restore it to working condition. I don't want to mess this one up in any way. I will try to talk him into letting me blast the fan and paint it, but as of now he says he wants it original. Can anyone tell me the year this one was produced? Thanks for any help

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The two start winding leads are soldered into the two centrifugal contacts on the back of the motor. You can try releasing the contact insulator from the back of the motor to see how long your leads are to get it out of the way for the PVC pipe method. If the leads are not long enough to get the rear contact with insulator out of the way, you can heat the solder joints on the contacts seen in the image to release the start winding leads to get the contacts with insulator out of the way. 

I just snipped the start winding leads in past close to the insulator and replaced the start winding leads once I had the stator out, cleaned, and varnished. Once the contacts with insulator is out of the way, you can use the PVC method to tap the stator out. 

 

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Edited by Russ Huber
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That round piece at 10 o'clock is a brass wedge to center the stator such that the rotor runs concentric inside of it. That wedge would need to be re-installed upon replacement of the stator. Also, the centrifugal switch is connected to the back of the stator. I would NOT remove the stator unless there is something wrong with it.

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Unfortunately it’ll cost you a lot more now when he decides to part with it. 

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30 minutes ago, Russ Huber said:

The two start winding leads are soldered into the two centrifugal contacts on the back of the motor. You can try releasing the contact insulator from the back of the motor to see how long your leads are to get it out of the way for the PVC pipe method. If the leads are not long enough to get the rear contact with insulator out of the way, you can heat the solder joints on the contacts seen in the image to release the start winding leads to get the contacts with insulator out of the way. 

I just snipped the start winding leads in past close to the insulator and replaced the start winding leads once I had the stator out, cleaned, and varnished. Once the contacts with insulator is out of the way, you can use the PVC method to tap the stator out. 

 

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PVC pipe would work here but I’d remove the screws holding the cent switch and loosen it. Then remove the brass wedges with a needle nose by wiggling them out. 
 

Lastly use two large screwdrivers to walk out the stator. Usually there’s enough grip on the laminates for the screwdriver to grab.  Saves you from reattaching the cent switch wires if they’re not bad. 

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37 minutes ago, Lane Shirey said:

PVC pipe would work here but I’d remove the screws holding the cent switch and loosen it. 

Remove what screws, Lane?

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38 minutes ago, Lane Shirey said:

PVC pipe would work here but I’d remove the screws holding the cent switch and loosen it. Then remove the brass wedges with a needle nose by wiggling them out. 
 

Lastly use two large screwdrivers to walk out the stator. Usually there’s enough grip on the laminates for the screwdriver to grab.  Saves you from reattaching the cent switch wires if they’re not bad. 

 

1 hour ago, Lane Shirey said:

Unfortunately it’ll cost you a lot more now when he decides to part with it. 

You just added more to when he decides to part with it. 🙂

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I prefer to use a large vise to get the stator out. Open the vise jaws until they just catch the outsides of the motor housing. A couple of good taps on the vise jaws & stator is out. I have had two bad results from the pipe method, so left it behind.

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Thanks  even if I have to cut the two wires and solder in new ones that should work either way.

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5 minutes ago, Stan Adams said:

I prefer to use a large vise to get the stator out. Open the vise jaws until they just catch the outsides of the motor housing. A couple of good taps on the vise jaws & stator is out. I have had two bad results from the pipe method, so left it behind.

 

5 minutes ago, Tim Babcock said:

Thanks  even if I have to cut the two wires and solder in new ones that should work either way.

Stan's method is cool if that makes you more comfortable. The goal is getting the stator out with either method. They typically slide out fairly easy. 

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Pipe and vice are both good methods (if using the vice, i like to use plastic jaws that are held to the vice with magnets so that you don't run the risk of chipping the finish).  If you decide to leave the male part of the start switch wired to the stator, make sure it is free from the housing as they seat down into the back of the housing tightly.  This will avoid the risk of the stator coming out and leaving the start contacts behind yielding broken wires.  

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FWIW....I have seen more than one brass wedge spacing an Emerson stator in the housing. After taking the stator out and later reinstalling it checking stator and rotor clearance around the full outer circumference of the rotor and found no need to reinstall them. And then on one big motor Emerson I had to use one wedge and turn it width wise ( a tad wider) and carefully drive it in to obtain centering the rotor in the stator. 

Edited by Russ Huber
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2 hours ago, Russ Huber said:

One of these is an Emerson 1510. The other is a pancake. 🙂

Don't toy with us, Russ.
       Which is which?

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2 hours ago, Jim Kovar said:

Don't toy with us, Russ.
       Which is more Yummy?

That's a no brainer.  Which reminds me, I forgot resupply my family size bags of Cheetos.

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I had to drill and put a self tapping screw in the spacer. It was in tight. After I pulled the spacer the stater tapped out with the pipe easily.

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This is what I use when pulling the stator and switch in one attempt.  Pipe with notch to go around start switch wires.  A heat gun made my last centrifugal switch pop off like a charm.  Never used heat before on one, but I’m a believer.  Lane has said in the past it makes the stiff wires supple again and works great for the switch removal without tearing it up.  I’m a little late on this post but might help someone in the future.

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