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GE Loop handle with brushes??


Steve Kelly
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I found this fan a while ago and was surprised to see brush caps. When I began collecting I started with loop handles. Never seen another with brushes. I thought maybe it was an early fan but it’s not a cast iron motor. Runs much slower on slow speed compared to my other loop handle fans. Anyone familiar with this type 

Thanks

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That’s an unusual model made for a very low frequency. Notice how the tag says it’s for 25-39 hz. It’s likely made with the brushes because 25-30 cycles is very slow for a ac motor to run on.

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Some or all of the GE fans made for 25 and 40 cycles have brushes yet are made for AC current.   I don't know why the brushes are necessary but that's the way they were made.  Watch for any signs of overheating when running at "normal" frequencies.   I had a Century skeletal made for 30 cycles and, while it rans well but slowly on 60 cycle current, the motor got hot after running for a while.

Edited by Steve Stephens
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Thanks. I dont know anything about electricity and cycles but I think I get the idea. Why the low cycle? Was this a early made fan? Did GE produce different fans for different areas or voltages?

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I know little, but,  most of the big names manufactured fans of various voltages and cycles. In the early days it wasn't standard everywhere in the US like today. On the old site there were numerous catalogues and brochures with the configurations. I have a high cycles, 125 if I remember, 1900 GE pancake for instance. Probably from the steel mills here in NWI. The brush motor low cycle fans probably had something to do with speed of the motor configuration or simple economy of the build.

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I believe if I remember right a lot of the areas with hydroelectric dams (like Niagra Falls and the Hoover Dam) used 25 and 40 Cycle AC, Niagra Falls Hydro Plant for Example was a 40 Cycle plant and I think Hoover Dam was originally 25 Cycles.

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17 hours ago, Roger Borg said:

I recall reading that LA was at 50 cycles for a long time. Please correct me if wrong...

That's correct. I still see 50 cycles out here in LA relatively frequently.

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I'm 73 years old and recall buying a refrigerator from a WHITE FRONT store in 1972. It was 50 cycles and concerned me. The large retail store assured me it wouldn't affect operation.  They said California  started converting to 60 cycles after WW2 and most appliances were marked 50/60 cycles. Many of my fan purchases have been 50 and run  fine. 

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