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Emerson assistance


Rick Powell
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I purchased this Emerson a couple years ago and finally got around to hanging it.  The fan makes an unbearable amount of noise that I know nothing about.  I think it may be from a bad bearing but perhaps from something else.  Also could someone identify the model and year of the fan?  Please look and listen to the video to ascertain what the issue may be.

Thanks,

Rick Powell

 

 

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Likely Emerson Trojan 8014. These were produced from 1904-1912 I believe. The bearings can be replaced if it is a constant grinding noise. If its a repetempetive "whomp" sound, it could be shaft wear but I'd start with the bearing. 

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I had trouble with the video, but what I heard is bearing noise. These are usually labeled Trojan as Andrew said, but i have one simply labeled Emerson with no Trojan anywhere.

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4 hours ago, Rick Powell said:

...Emerson...  ...fan makes an unbearable amount of noise...

Rick,...

any chance you accidentally
put GE bearings in it?  wondering.gif.9b9959b76d0399345d4f8e9cc51091b1.gif

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If it is grinding then yes to bad bearings.  Bearings are cheap though. You can find new equivalent or better bearings all over the place.  From the sound of the post it seems like it was not opened for insoection.  I would do that first.  Also make sure yoy put in the right level of fresh oil.  Grinding might also be the stator making contact with the rotor if there somethjng made it into the gap.  Growling might be resistance to the rotor causing the motor to strain.  All the more reason to take off the blades and do an inspect.  

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Chris I did nothing to it prior to installation other than seeing it rotated when powered up without the blades attached. I am not certain how much oil to put in it I probably put in 1/2 ounce of Royal Purple. 
Thanks for your assistance 

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Rick, I used to put Royal Purple, but have gone back to 20wt oil. Ceiling fans turn slow enough there is no need for expensive oil & there are no bearing pores to clog. I have a Hunter measuring bottle I use, but you can also bend a wire which will go in the oil cup beside the rotor. Fill until 3/4" or so from the top of the cup.

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Stan, I use whatever is handy. I've used 30wt oil from the car sometimes when they've got some wear to them. As you stated correctly, no pores to clog up so detergent oil is fine.

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Andrew thanks for the information on the type and year, I just cleaned the name plate and it is a Trojan.  Do you know the bearing it takes and where to obtain them?

 

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On an old ceiling fan I would minimum blow it out carefully, remove the rotor for inspection and decrud the oil bath.  It will likely make any defects obvious.  I used SAE30 full synthetic Amsoil because I am into cars and have it handy.  For what it is worth I do not consider oil to be expensive, especially compared to fan parts.  I believe Redline gear lube smells too nasty but if it did not I would likely use it due to its excellent lubricity.  The oil level would be similar to Hunter.  Enough to fully immerse the bearing and maybe 5mm higher than the bearing as a rough estimate.  New bearing if you wish probably costs under 20, cheaper if you go Chinese.  To clean the crud I soak it in gasoline overnight and scrub with a toothbrush.  After tidying and oil, your fan should run like silk.

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By the way, if you cannot find an actual part number on the bearing, jist take it out, measure the thickness, OD and ID and do a search in metric and then in std.  You should find some new equivalent which will have races and more balls (better I think) and likely available on Ebay for cheap.

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No problem, just double check your bearing thickness, OD and ID compared to this.  You may need to add some shims if too thin or just search for another bearing.  Andrew also suggested needle thrust bearings in the past to make the fan quieter.  I bought a couple of those too, have yet to test them.  

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8 hours ago, Jim Kovar said:

Rick,...

any chance you accidentally
put GE bearings in it?  wondering.gif.9b9959b76d0399345d4f8e9cc51091b1.gif

large.jpg.408b96ec15ef1bab10f90ff69ef539bb.jpg

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Jim I think you nailed it, how on  earth did you know that was the bearing? Great job!

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On 7/24/2023 at 8:34 PM, Jim Kovar said:

large.jpg.408b96ec15ef1bab10f90ff69ef539bb.jpg

I have a 1920s GE Ceiling Fan and it doesn't use a Bearing like that...🤨

Of course maybe that's why my GE Ceiling fan is noisy because it has Emerson bearings in it... 😁

643256254_GECeilingFanBearingRace.thumb.JPG.3554e3ce2c8e95d29b1176d4a3d8808f.JPG

Edited by Levi Mevis
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